Luggage Security: Tips for Securing Your Luggage

Your luggage may not be as secure as you think. Even if you have chosen your luggage with great care, the locks that secure it may not be sophisticated enough to guard against experienced professional thieves.

Even if you have chosen your luggage with great care, the locks that secure it may not be sophisticated enough to guard against experienced professional thieves. At best, they may prove to be a deterrent. Keep in mind that a thief is usually in a hurry; he wants to finish the job as soon as possible and make his escape. Here are a few ideas that will make your luggage seem like it really isn’t worth the trouble:

Make sure you purchase your luggage wisely. Invest in pieces that are sturdy and durable. A potential thief may be put off by luggage that looks hard to violate.

Avoid over packing. Aside from the obvious advantages of traveling light, a moderately packed suitcase is unlikely to open if dropped.

Tag your luggage with your business address and telephone number. If possible, use a closed nametag with a cover. Do not use a laminated business card on your luggage, and avoid putting the company name or any logos on your luggage; well-known names tend to attract thieves.

Make things as difficult as possible; if your luggage only has a single combination lock, set a different combination on each piece of luggage you are carrying. If your suitcase or briefcase has two combination locks, try resetting the combination locks to a different combination on each of the right and left locks.

However secure you think your luggage is, it is a good idea to strap it. Run a strip of nylon filament tape around your suitcases to prevent them from accidentally opening if dropped or manhandled by baggage handlers. This will also serve to deter thieves, as a strapped suitcase takes too long to break into.

Finally, a simple precaution: if you are traveling abroad, obtain only a modest sum of foreign currency before you leave. Criminals often watch for and target international travelers purchasing large amounts of foreign currency at airport banks and currency exchange windows.

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