Using Your Brand Name Clients On Your Website? Think Twice

Should you mention your big brand name clients in your marketing and sales material? The right answer depends on how you answer this question.
brand name clients

Companies love putting logos of brand name clients on their website. That’s great if your primary market is other brand name companies – those large enterprise clients look for social or other proof that you know how to work clients like them.

However, if your primary market is small- or -mid-size companies, using brand name logos sends the wrong message to your prospects in the blink of an eye.

Brand Name Clients

Should you mention your big brand name clients in your marketing and sales material?

The right answer depends on how you answer this question:

  • What are the characteristics of your ideal clients, the ones that drive the most revenue?

Let’s say I’m a prospect that runs a 20-person company, which might be a perfect size business for your solution. If I see client logos like Amazon, Oracle, or Nike, I’ll instantly think you only work with big brands or that you’re going to be really expensive and I probably can’t afford you – and I bounce off of your website.

What to Post In Place of Brand Name Clients

So, what can you do if prospects wouldn’t easily recognize your client’s names or logos? There are 2 easy ways to address this:

1. Add Testimonials Containing Metrics

Include a testimonial that has metrics in it, ideally from one of your client’s executives or decision makers who has a job title that would resonate with your prospects.

Examples:

  • We reduced processing time from 2 days to 3 hours
  • We increased our pipeline by 200% without adding more staff
  • We saved $30,000 the first month

Metrics driven testimonials show results, which is critical in conveying why prospects should hire you. If you can link the testimonial to a case study, that’s even better.

2. Use Journey Button

Let your prospect self identify by clicking a “journey” button, which is a button to a path they can identify with. For example, you could show “Start Ups”, “Small Business”, “Enterprises” or you could do it by vertical, such as “Financial”, “Education,” “Agencies,” and so on.

Also Read: Website Redesign Checklist to Revamp your Website

Your goal is to make your prospect identify with the types of companies you work with. When that happens, you draw them into your message rather than conveying (in that blink of an eye) that they’re not a fit for you.


Author

Raj Khera is publisher of MoreBusiness.com and a 3x CEO of B2B SaaS companies that were acquired by public firms. He has worked with small businesses as well as brand name clients.

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